Mifepristone is a pill that can be used to end a pregnancy in the first 20 weeks. It’s safe, effective, and available at clinics and hospitals. The Pill was approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000 for ending early pregnancies (2-20 weeks after your first day of the last period). Mifepristone works by blocking progesterone, a hormone needed to maintain an early pregnancy. Without this hormone, the embryo dies and your body passes it out of your body within 4 days of taking mifepristone.

Mifepristone is a pill used to end a pregnancy.

Mifepristone is a pill used to end a pregnancy. It works by blocking the hormone progesterone and causing the uterus to shed its lining so it cannot support a pregnancy. 

  • It’s safe for almost everyone
  • It’s safe for most women who have had a surgical abortion

You can take misoprostol at home after you take mifepristone.

After you take mifepristone, you can take misoprostol at home to cause uterine contractions. The pills will cause cramping and bleeding that can last several hours to a few days.

  • Misoprostol is used to prepare the cervix for delivery of a fetus or embryo (afterbirth), including inducing labor.
  • Misoprostol causes mild cramps and bleeding that can be either heavy or light, depending on how far along the pregnancy is. If this happens, you may need to change your sanitary pad or tampon often.
  • However, if you have severe pain after taking misoprostol, get medical attention right away as it may mean there was an incomplete abortion (miscarriage). Call 911 if this happens and/or you have severe bleeding (more than what would be considered normal).

Conclusion

Mifepristone is a safe and effective way to end an early pregnancy. It can be taken as early as 10 weeks after the first day of your last period, but it’s best to take the pills within 70 days (10 weeks). The pills are usually taken in person at the clinic and you may need to rest for a few hours before going home.

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